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Dog Training Classes Vancouver & Calgary

Updated: Mar 30, 2023

So you've got a new dog. Now what?

A miniature schnauzer sits on a log in the rain forest in Vancouver during a dog training class.
A miniature schnauzer sits on a log in the rain forest in Vancouver during a dog training class.

Congratulations! The day has arrived: you are officially a dog owner. You have brought home a puppy or a dog and now your family has a plus one.


The enthusiasm and novelty of having this four-legged addition can be overwhelming for some new pet parents. Not surprisingly, the new landscape can also be overwhelming for your new housemate. New sounds, smells, sights, food, bed, toys, and people: this new environment can be daunting for your new pet.

Here are a few things to keep in mind to get you and your pooch started:


1. Set boundaries immediately. For instance, if you do not want the dog on the couch in the future, don’t allow the pooch on the couch now.

2. Avoid 20-minute walks and routine behaviour and schedules. Instead, take the dog out for adventures, trails, into stores, and out to meet other dogs.

3. Limit your toy purchases to three. Take time to learn what your dog loves to play with and how they like to play. No tennis balls allowed! These balls are abrasive and wear down your dog’s teeth which can result in thousands of dollars of vet bills in the future.

4. Begin adding Plaque Off to every meal. This will help safeguard your dog’s teeth from excessive tarter build up.

5. Purchase a martingale collar and 6 foot leash. Avoid harnesses, as they are not just a waste of money but actually create bad habits and can put your dog in danger. Dogs often slip out of their harnesses accidentally, which can cause terrible accidents, and they also encourage a dog to pull. Any “anti pull” advertisement you might see is false. Follow this link for the correct gear, Hustle Up Dog Training Dog Collars & Dog Leashes.


How do you choose the right group dog training class?

The dog training market is saturated with people who claim they are the best, so you need to look for one who focuses on empowering you to control and work with your dog. Avoid trainers who use gimmicks such as food-based “treat” training. Instead, look for a dog trainer who has experience, success and can prove his or her efficacy with results. Most trainers can train a dog to do certain things when bribed with a treat, but that is not training which gives you consistent and predictable control over your dog. Your dog must bond with you without the use of gimmicks such as clicker or treat training.


Never lose sight of the facts that all puppies and dogs have the innate ability to learn and also that it is more effective to bond than to bribe.


What does a Hustle Up group dog training class look like?

Dog training classes--or as some say “obedience classes”-- should be fun, exciting, and challenging. If you are looking for a great dog trainer and dog training experience, look at a program such as the one I offer. All group dog training classes are conducted outdoors, with an average of two 1.5-hour classes per week.


Group obedience classes are for everyone, not the select few. All dogs need friends, buddies and acquaintances. Dogs need dog friends to go for coffees with their owner, hiking friends, shopping friends, as well as dog daycare and dog park buddies. They need a social life. From wrestling mate to swimming pals; if you can name it, they want and need it.


Vancouver group dog training classes are crazy fun! The dogs and owners are encouraged to push the envelope of success. No two classes are ever the same because the environment changes; as in “real life”, so in training. Many dog trainers teach inside a hall, community centre, pet store or gymnasium. These are the worst places a dog should be trained. Stagnated stimulation hampers learning. This is why Hustle Up group dog and people training is superior to the rest. We fill our training with challenges that engage mental and physical stimulation on your part, as well as your pet’s part.


I love what I do! If you want to laugh, run around and have fun with your dog, my group training is for you. Some added perks:


1. Bond with your dog

2. Learn to control your dog

3. Train without silly sacks attached to your body filled with food

4. Train without making odd click, click, click sounds

5. Learn to train your dog with distractions

6. Get empowered with multiple tools to teach your dog

7. Take the water taxi with your dog

8. Learn at a coffee shop

9. Learn proper etiquette at a dog friendly brewery with your dog

10. Window shopping turns into shopping: have the skills and confidence to take your dog to pet friendly stores

11. Group training is a healthier alternative than one-on-one

12. 24/7 support with email, text or call

13. Multiple workshops available

14. Group dog training becomes a dog community for your dog and you

15. Fun and challenging learning to create great memories and make new friends


Here's a recent dog training client testimonial

December 21st, 2022

Merry Christmas, Brad! We’re so glad that we met you in the hood last spring before we brought Ellie home and grateful that you’ve been with us every step of the way, as we’ve learned to become her people and as she’s learned to be a good dog citizen. You’ve gave us the information we need to keep us all safe but even more, you’ve made our life with Ellie so much fun with your creative ideas for walks and adventures and play. I look at most people on the block walking their dogs on the sidewalk and throwing a ball for half an hour and I think “Too bad they don’t know Brad!”

Best wishes for health and happiness! See you in 2023!



In a nutshell…

We take pride in teaching how to accomplish building a healthy, loving and unbreakable bond between owner and dog. Touch, understanding, compliance of requests, and responsibility to one another. These are the foundations we teach. Understanding the responsibility from the dog’s perspective is crucial in addition to supporting the dog to grow into him or herself. Our goal is to foster happy well-mannered dogs and happy owners.


Brad and Kya the border collie working together during a hiking workshop. Touch is being used as a form of communication to alert one another if they need to assist with the people and dogs below.
Brad and Kya the border collie working together during a hiking workshop. Touch is being used as a form of communication to alert one another if they need to assist with the people and dogs below.

Rest paw between owner and dog when the dog is sleeping. This dog works closely with the owner. Therefore, even when the dog is sleeping, any slight movement from the human would wake up and alert the dog that it is time to go. Movement speed helps to describe to the dog the urgency of the situation and how the dog is to respond.
Rest paw between owner and dog when the dog is sleeping. This dog works closely with the owner. Therefore, even when the dog is sleeping, any slight movement from the human would wake up and alert the dog that it is time to go. Movement speed helps to describe to the dog the urgency of the situation and how the dog is to respond.

Max the border collie is blind in one eye. Reassurance of his safety on his blind side alleviates stress and worry. Max relaxes and trusts a hand moving slowly and firmly when massaging his blindside.
Max the border collie is blind in one eye. Reassurance of his safety on his blind side alleviates stress and worry. Max relaxes and trusts a hand moving slowly and firmly when massaging his blindside.

What do other dog obedience classes look like in comparison to Hustle Up?


Others – 45-60 minute class

Hustle Up - 90 minute class: 33% longer


Others – Indoor training

Hustle Up – Outdoor training: cafés, shops, water taxi, dog parks, on the street….everywhere


Others – Give food for doing something, creating unwanted behavior (begging, jumping up, stealing food)

Hustle Up – Praise with touch and words – you learn first-hand how to build a trusting loving bond between you and your dog


Others – Dog training engagement average is 17 minutes per class, plus stand around and wait

Hustle Up – Dog training engagement average is full duration of class, 90 minutes, or 180 minutes per week


Others – Available classes per week: 1

Hustle Up - Available classes per week: 2


Others – Location the same every week

Hustle Up – Location changes per class, achieving optimum learning with new stimulation


Others – Treats, treat bag, different gear such as harness, assorted collars, and clickers

Hustle Up – Martingale Collar, leash and enthusiasm


Others – Extra support available during working hours only

Hustle Up – Extra support anytime: text, call, or email me


Others - Weekly cost to train your dog: average cost $50 per week to refill treats, or $2600.00 a year. This reoccurring expense is on-going: $13,000.00 in five years. Just for treats.

Hustle Up – Weekly cost to train your dog: no cost other than your time, enthusiasm, and commitment


Others – You miss a class, you don’t get to make it up

Hustle Up – Guaranteed 14 classes regardless if you miss a class or two--you are always guaranteed to get what you pay for. You get 14 classes and then an option for drop ins.


Others – Will tell you they will slowly take away the treats with which they bribed your dog. This is really just more time and money to retrain out of a negative behaviour you never wanted in the first place.

Hustle Up – No treats, no fads! The bond between you and your dog will begin day one with the education and training you receive


Others – No discount

Hustle Up – 10% off on dog gear


Others – Offer not much else

Hustle Up – Access to additional workshops such as hiking with your dog, search and locate, bear awareness and more


Others – Restricted amount of family members allowed to participate in class

Hustle UpNo age limit and the whole family encouraged to participate


A dog owner hikes with her border collie dog pal during a dog hike workshop in Vancouver with Hustle Up Dog Training, professional dog trainers Canada.
A dog owner hikes with her border collie dog pal during a dog hike workshop in Vancouver with Hustle Up Dog Training, professional dog trainers Canada.

A weekend hike can be fun and enjoyable. Are you prepared for when the unexpected happens? Our Hiking Workshop may save your life. A must-do workshop if you go hiking with your dog.


Brad Pattison, Dog Behaviorist Vancouver, on a two-way radio communicating with others on a Search & Locate dog workshop with Hustle Up Dog Training, Trainers for Dogs.
Brad Pattison, Dog Behaviourist Vancouver, and Bodhi the border heeler, on a two-way radio communicating with others on a Search & Locate dog workshop with Hustle Up Dog Training, Trainers for Dogs.

Our Search & Locate workshop is fun and exciting, plus utterly exhausting for your dog. Have you ever wanted your dog to be concerned enough to locate you in the woods? This takes hide and seek to the next level. Your dog will learn to use her ears, eyes and nose to track you down.


Hustle Up Dog Training clients on a dog hiking workshop doing some rope work with the dogs.
Hustle Up Dog Training clients on a dog hiking workshop doing some rope work with the dogs.

Dog Bear Workshop: learn how to recognize when a bear is in the area, learn how your dog will respond, and what you and your dog should do upon encountering a bear.


A black bear standing in a river with rock in the background during a Bear Workshop with Hustle Up Dog Training, as clients learn safety tips when hiking with their dogs and they encounter wildlife.
A black bear standing in a river with rock in the background during a Bear Workshop with Hustle Up Dog Training, as clients learn safety tips when hiking with their dogs and they encounter wildlife.


Dog Gear: what works and what doesn’t?


Gear that does not work:

Harness: Harnesses are designed to tell a dog to pull; they’re essentially designed for sled dogs. There is no such thing as an “anti pull” or “no pull” harness. A harness is a harness. The #1 complaint from dog owners is “My dog pulls me.”


Gentle leader – I would never allow a client to use this ever! The band under the eyes often rides up, placing pressure on the dog’s eyeball. This causes great pain and discomfort. If you don’t believe me, try placing each pinky finger directly under your eyes and push up under your eyeballs.


Four-foot leash – Yikes! Let’s talk about being restricted and having no fun. The constant pressure against your dog limits him from enjoying his life.


Choke chain – First word “choke”…no thank you! The choke chain will only work on the side it is set up for. This means your dog cannot have the freedom to move about and avoid collisions.


Flat buckle collar – When sized incorrectly, dogs slip out and are on the loose. Huge danger to the dog!


Prong or Pinch collars – These may seem convenient but once the collar is removed from the dog, the dog still pulls. The teaching and messaging behind the collar to the dog does not resonate not to pull on leash unless this is actually on the dog.


Gear that actually works:

Martingale collar – By far, this collar is in a class of its own. It is the absolute go-to collar for safety and training. It releases immediately when tension is released from the leash, it will not slip off when sized correctly, it is great for giving a quick reminder, and it is safe for your dog. Simply put, it is the best training collar for your dog.


Enrol for private dog training or group dog training classes Vancouver, dog training classes Surrey and dog training classes Calgary here.


Written by Brad Pattison, Dog Behaviourist, Vancouver Dog Trainer & Puppy Trainer

Follow us on socials, IG: @hustleupdogs & Facebook: Hustle Up Dog Training

Email us anytime with questions & comments at info@hustleupdogtraining.ca

For further information call CA +1 (250) 317-0274

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