top of page
Search

3 Most Common Dog Behaviour Problems

In this blog I will discuss the three most common complaints about puppies and dogs, some things to do (and avoid) to prevent unwanted canine behaviours and some solutions.

A black and white dog barking, howling and whining, one of the most common canine behavioural issues pet owners have to deal with.
A black and white dog barking, howling and whining, one of the most common canine behavioural issues pet owners have to deal with.

Jumping up


Jumping up is a problematic issue with a dog yet many people allow a puppy to jump up. Jumping up classification is when a puppy or dog removes front paws from ground and places the paws on a person.


We, the people are the reason why puppies jump up and continue to jump up when they age into adult dogs. Accidentally we encourage, support and embrace puppies to jump up, additionally people are elevating puppies by picking them up. Coddling a puppy in the arms, permitting the puppy to be on furniture and on the persons lap. Inadvertently we are telling the puppy where they are to be.


Imagine being a puppy, you are told, supported and made to be on or jump up on a person. Then you get a bit bigger and you are told not to place your paws or jump up to be picked up. For months you have been doing as you are made to and then you are in trouble for doing what you have been expected too for a few months.


This is ultimately confusing for the dog as well as unfair. People are the main cause part and partially because they set the puppy up for failure. At an early age, puppies are permitted to clamour on mom and interact with the siblings. At no time are they picked up and carried everywhere. Puppies need to be left on the ground to avoid future issues.


Barking


Dogs barking excessively can become a serious issue when they live in a condo, apartment or a house. When living with close neighbours barking issues cause a great deal of stress and concern. Having a guest arrive and the dog gets out of control barking when the doorbell rings poses its own problems.


Some breeds of dogs are prone to bark and alert more so than others. A basenji is a very quiet dog with nearly zero barking issues. A schnauzer is a barker by nature. They can be taught to limit the barking or alerting to a minimum if training and interrupting is implemented early on.


Many dog barking issues are promoted and even encouraged by the owner.


The first encounter with a puppy barking can often be compared to a baby uttering its first word. While this may be exciting, it's important to understand the distinction between the two. Puppies can easily develop a habit of excessive barking, which may seem harmless initially but can later cause frustration and annoyance for dog owners. It is crucial to teach dogs when it is appropriate to bark and when it is not. Alert barking, when done in moderation and under control, can be beneficial. However, incessant barking that spirals out of control should be avoided. Repeatedly commanding a dog to stop barking often proves ineffective in curbing the behaviour. To address dog barking issues effectively, learn how to stop your dog from barking excessively and manage dog barking noise appropriately.


Repeating a command to stop the barking will result in a fail to stop the barking.

Yelling from another room results in a fail.

Not doing anything results in a fail.

In order to be successful, the dog needs to be interrupted early into the barking. One bark and a command to stop and or you need to physically manage the dog.


Dog pulling on leash


One of the most dangerous and frustrating behaviours a dog can exhibit is pulling on the leash. This behaviour not only poses a risk for bodily injury to both the dog and its owner, but it can also be incredibly aggravating. Common injuries resulting from a pulling dog include strained shoulder muscles, being pulled to the ground, wrist fractures, scrapes, bruises, and even broken hips. These injuries occur frequently when dogs exert force while being walked. The primary cause for this issue is often the type of harness used during walks. Despite any marketing claims about anti-pull harnesses, there is no such thing. Harnesses are designed primarily for comfort rather than preventing pulling behaviour. In fact, harnesses are specifically designed to allow dogs to pull as they are intended for that purpose. If you're wondering how to stop your dog from pulling on the leash or how to prevent a puppy from exhibiting this behaviour, it's important to consider alternative methods or seek professional assistance in dog training.


Dogs slip out of harnesses all the time, they are sized incorrectly, they come in colours which are designed for the consumer to buy. The harness is the root of all evil in my opinion for being the most dangerous to people and dogs.


When it comes to teaching a dog to stop pulling on the leash, many dog owners turn to the use of a dog harness for support. However, there is an additional issue that often goes unaddressed. Rather than tackling the problem head-on, treat trainers tend to overlook the pulling issue and instead focus on coaxing dogs with food. They consider this approach as training, but it fails to provide a long-term solution. Once the food is no longer in sight, dogs go back to their pulling habits. The root cause of pulling lies in allowing puppies or dogs to pull without ever addressing the behaviour. It's important to note that harnesses are not a solution for puppies or dogs that pull on their leashes.


I have recognized the conversation about collars hurting or damaging the neck or trachea. This is an overblown and often lied about topic to drive fear into the dog owner to purchase a harness.


A dog training tip for you

In my dog training a pulling dog can easily be fixed. Changing of direction as soon as a dog begins to pull, is a great tool to add into your movement to teach the dog to move with you.


Brad Pattison has his Border Collie dog, Kya, on umbilical hands free training leash and is demonstrating that changing direction and movement teaches your dog how to stop pulling on the lead. Photo credit: @devoncphotograph
Brad Pattison has his Border Collie dog, Kya, on umbilical hands free training leash demonstrating that changing direction and movement teaches your dog how to stop pulling on the lead. Photo credit: @devoncphotograph



About the Author

Written by Brad Pattison, Dog Behaviourist, Dog Trainer & Puppy Trainer

Follow us on socials, IG: @hustleupdogs & Facebook: Hustle Up Dog Training

Email us anytime with questions & comments at info@hustleupdogtraining.ca

For further information call CA +1 (250) 317-0274


116 views0 comments

Comments


Commenting has been turned off.
bottom of page